Sumber gambar-gambar dari IconScout, lisensi Creative Commons

Artikel ini adalah yang kedua dalam seri “Menuju Apotek 2.0: Fasilitas Kesehatan Berorientasi Pelanggan”. Lihat tulisan pertama di sini.

Delapan tahun lalu, saya pernah memperkerjakan seorang ART (Asisten Rumah Tangga) yang agak berumur. Panggilannya “Bik Sit” (kependekan dari Siti). Usianya saat itu mungkin 50-an tahun. Buta huruf. Salah satu tugasnya adalah menemani anak saya kalau kedua orang tuanya sedang di luar. Waktu itu anak pertama saya masih berusia di bawah satu tahun. Sebenarnya tidak ada yang salah dari Bik Sit, tapi dia terlihat sering sakit, terutama sakit batuk. Karena kami takut anak tertular batuk (apakah batuk biasa, atau jangan-jangan ia…


Illustration by Iconscout is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.

Catatan: Artikel ini adalah yang pertama dalam seri “Menuju Apotek 2.0: Fasilitas Kesehatan Berorientasi Pelanggan”

Dilihat sepintas lalu, situasi di sebuah apotek terlihat mirip seperti di toko pada umumnya. Ada produk yang disusun rapi, kasir tempat melakukan transaksi, dan tentu saja pembeli yang datang untuk membeli obat atau vitamin. Transaksi dilakukan, lalu pembeli pulang dengan membawa barang yang telah dibayar.

Dilihat sepintas lalu, situasi di sebuah apotek terlihat mirip seperti di toko pada umumnya. Ada produk yang disusun rapi, kasir tempat melakukan transaksi, dan tentu saja pembeli yang datang untuk membeli obat atau vitamin. …


In the span of two years between 2016 and 2017, the country welcomed its four first local unicorns. For those who are not familiar with the Indonesian start-up ecosystem, they are Go-Jek (ride-hailing, at least at that time it was their main business model before they ventured to become a fintech player then eventually a super-app), Traveloka (travel-tech), Tokopedia and Bukalapak (both horizontal marketplaces). At that time, the word Unicorn became a household term, and several events like NextICorn (next Indonesian unicorns) were held by the government. Everybody thought that the momentum will continue uninterrupted. …


Image by Mudassar Iqbal from Pixabay

What’s not to love about Impact Investing? It takes the most benevolent aspects of capitalism, i.e., innovations and creative destruction and then tries to ensure the most benefits to the society. However, despite the potential and recent rapid growth of the sector, even a simple observation shows that the public in general has not fully embraced it yet. Is there something that the Impact Investing community has not done right in term of spreading the idea around?

In the past fifteen years, the Impact Investing community is focusing on building and perfecting its “product”, i.e., bringing the return on investment…


Image source: Anonymous Art of Revolution

Do you think you put long hours for nothing important? Do you have to do more administrative work than you would ever like? Do you often dream for a more exciting, adventurous work, but can’t make the move for various reasons? In short, do you think your current job match the qualifications of being a bullshit job?

If you said yes to any of the above questions, do not despair. There is an effective cure to it: writing about your work. Although there is no guarantee that it can help you earn more or work less hours (though it might)…


The world produces enough food to feed 10 billion people. Malaria is an entirely preventable and treatable disease. An average simple caesarean section costs less than USD 150. It costs on average about 29 US cents per day to provide clean water for each person. A single-pit VIP family latrine can be built for as low as USD 70.

However, as late as either 2018 or 2019, the world still saw that 815 million people in chronic hunger, 405,000 people died of malaria every year — most were young children in sub-Saharan Africa, 295,000 women died during and following pregnancy…


World Peace Gong in New Delhi, India. The first of such gongs was installed in Bali in December 2002, or two months after the first of the two Bali bombings. Image credit: Rolling Okie via Flickr

The world is, unfortunately, a very unequal place with certain countries very wealthy and others have very low standard of living. Even within countries, GINI indicators are showing that the gap between the rich and the poor are widening in most regions except Latin America, whose base was very low anyway. Zooming in on the poor communities, there are racial, caste, and gender equality issues that deny access to resources for some members of these communities.

Impact investing as a nascent sector is thrown right into this complicated mixture of inequalities. While it is impossible for a sector that is…


Image Credit: Pxhere

Impact investing as a term was coined not so long ago, back in 2008, but the seeds of impact investing stretched far before that. We need to go back to the middle of last century, when the world was in ruin from the worst war ever waged by the human race, the nuclear arms race was just beginning, and nobody was thinking that capital can be deployed in poor countries in Asia or Africa, let alone in the remotest corners of these countries like what have been achieved by the impact investing community of today.

There are many events that…


Procession of King Ashoka on His Chariot. He was often considered a quintessential benevolent ruler during his reign in 268 to 232 BCE. Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Governments around the developing world like to claim that they support entrepreneurship, especially social entrepreneurship. To show their intent, most of them have created agencies that aim to develop and nurture startups. In Southeast Asia alone, I have met or attended events organized by these agencies, including Indonesia’s BEKRAF¹, Malaysia’s MaGIC, Singapore’s raiSE, and Thailand’s TSEO. Their most visible programs involve organizing conferences for entrepreneurs, providing grant capital and non-monetary support like training or incubation services. UK’s Big Society Capital is one of the most ambitious of these kind of government agencies, allocating GBP 600 million to invest in social…


Image: Pikrepo

Some impact investors, especially in the early 2010s, like to employ the armchair approach to investing. They set up an office in their home country (mostly in developed Western countries), hire someone to “survey”¹ the landscape in the developing countries, and invest out of a global fund. While this approach might work in tech startup investing², the result had often been disappointing for impact investors. I have seen at least three impact investors exited or pivoted their strategy in Indonesia after years of frustration of not being able to make a single investment.

The opposite of the armchair approach is…

Adi Sudewa

Venture Builder. In Medium to share perspectives on how industries are being transformed by digital technologies.

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